human rights

April 2022 newsletter: Justice for Phichit

Free trade agreements: Corporate greed makes the right to water of Phichit villagers a distant reality

In Central Thailand’s Phichit province, a group of villagers resisted a goldmining company that polluted their water and destroyed their livelihoods for almost 20 years. Manushya Foundation have written a comprehensive exposé documenting the villagers' fight against corporate impunity and state exploitation.

Free trade agreements: Corporate greed makes the right to water of Phichit villagers a distant reality

In Central Thailand’s Phichit province, a group of villagers resisted a gold mine that polluted their water and destroyed their livelihoods and health for almost 20 years. When the Chatree Goldmining Complex was finally closed in 2017, the villagers had one goal left: to get justice and fair compensation for the damages caused by Akara Resources, a Thai subsidiary of Australian company Kingsgate. In a cynical development the company decided to bring Thailand to arbitration under the Thailand-Australia Free Trade Agreement, claiming the Thai government expropriated the gold mine and leaving Phichit villagers to fear for their future. After five years of arbitration, the military-backed government of Prayut Chan-o-cha decided to put profit above people and the planet and renewed four licences to Kingsgate, allowing it to re-open the Chatree complex. Meanwhile villagers are still yet to receive compensation for the environmental, physical and emotional harm they have suffered over the past 20 years. 

March 2022 newsletter: Alana's Dakar diary, expanding civic space, countering corporate capture & more

End Water Poverty were part of the Forum Alternatif Mondial de l’Eau (FAME 2022) last week, where hundreds of water and social justice activists from around the world gathered in Dakar, Senegal. The theme of FAME was “access to water and sanitation is a matter of public health and a barometer of democracy”.

From service providers to rights-based advocates: the shifting strategies of civil society in Odisha, India

Drought, disease, dissolution, death - these are the stark realities of life without safe water. Quality of life, health, and hygiene largely depend on safe drinking water and proper sanitation. Yet in many areas of rural India these fundamental human rights have not been realised - especially among poor and marginalised people. Odisha, as one of the least progressive states in the country, needs more attention than most.